Extension of SCIP notification to EEA countries

Published 
December 21, 2022

SCIP notification extended to other countries

Since November 7, 2022, SCIP notification (Substances of Concern In articles or in complex objects (Products)) has been extended to more members of the European Economic Area (EEA). Companies in Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway are now required to submit SCIP notifications to ECHA on their products containing substances of very high concern. This obligation is a result of the amendments to the EU Waste Framework Directive in the EEA Agreement.

This will ultimately make it easier for companies in Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway to export to the European Union as their products will be directly compliant with the EU regulation.

Understanding the SCIP notification

European Union (EU) countries are obliged to report data on their substances of concern to the SCIP database.

The SCIP database was created by the ECHA on October 28, 2020, via an amendment to the Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC). Its objective is to ensure transparency on the hazardous substances contained in articles in Europe and thus prevent potential risks when recycling waste.

As of January 5, 2021, companies were obligated to notify the SCIP database. The database is now populated by suppliers of articles containing SVHC (Substances of Very High Concern) in a concentration of more than 0.1% w/w. This includes EU manufacturers, EU importers and distributors of articles (for placing on the EU market). However, retailers supplying articles directly to consumers are still not required to provide information to ECHA.

The information to be provided in a SCIP submission should allow for the identification of the article and its safe uses, containing information such as the name, concentration range and location of the SVHC in the article.

The SCIP database now has 8.7 million searchable article notifications from over 8,600 companies in the EU.

By accessing the SCIP database, consumers can make more informed purchasing decisions. ECHA announced that the database also allows "waste operators to further develop the reuse of items and recycling of materials."

How do I submit a SCIP notification?

Reminder, companies that supply articles containing substances of very high concern (SVHC) in concentrations above 0.1% w/w are required to submit this information to ECHA. Failure to do so may result in penalties.

Are you looking to easily generate your SCIP declaration and ensure the traceability of your hazardous substances throughout your supply chain? EcoMundo’s SVHC Factory solution will allow you to outsource the collection of all your compliance certificates (SVHC, RoHS, Prop 65, Conflict Minerals...) and generate all necessary documentation as well as your SCIP declaration files.

Want to know more about SCIP notification?

For more information, please contact one of our SVHC and SCIP notification team members below: Contact us !

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